Shopping with SMEs makes consumers happiest

7th September 2015

Small retailers are giving British consumers the most enjoyable shopping experience, according to a new survey of 2,000 adults, commissioned by Avery WePrint.

The report suggests there’s much more to buying from a small business than simply supporting the local economy: it actually makes buyers feel happier knowing they’ve bought from a small retailer than a large corporation.

More than 80 per cent of respondents said they had feelings of happiness or contentment when they made a purchase from a small business; compared to a figure of just 53 per cent when buying from a larger company.

Around 25 per cent of respondents said choosing to buy from a small retailer made them feel good about themselves; ranging from hair cuts and fresh fruit and vegetables to jewellery and vehicle repairs.

Fiona Mills, marketing director, Avery WePrint, said: “We commissioned the study to show just how much the UK’s small and independent businesses have to be proud of.

“We want to encourage these organisations to celebrate their status as a small business, it’s something very special.

“There’s no feeling quite like starting and growing your own business, so why not shout about it?”

The top ten products and services UK consumers would like to buy from a small business are:

  • Hair cuts

  • Restaurant meals

  • Fresh produce (such as fruit and vegetables)

  • Takeaway tea and coffee

  • Greetings cards, gifts and presents

  • Car repairs and services

  • Books, newspapers and magazines

  • Snacks and food-to-go

  • Jewellery

  • Artwork

The report found that Brits were more likely to put their faith in a small business owner than the CEO of a larger organisation.

A third of survey respondents felt that small business owners were trustworthy compared with just five per cent of Brits that felt CEOs of big businesses could be trusted.

When respondents were asked to describe a typical small business owner in one word, the most popular response was “hard working”, cited by almost three-quarters of respondents. However, only 22 per cent of people felt this term applied to bosses of bigger businesses.

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