One-in-five start-ups begin as second jobs

17th June 2015 | News

More than a fifth (21 per cent) of new businesses founded in the last 12 months began as a second job while still in full-time employment, according to new research from alldayPA.

The survey, which included 500 small business owners, found there is an increasing demand for call answering services from aspiring entrepreneurs that ‘double-job’, with new accounts up almost a third (32 per cent) in the last year.

Second jobs remain very common in the UK. Latest HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC) statistics indicate that 1.2 million people have official second jobs, up from 1.05 million in the pre-recession climate of 2007.

Almost 500,000 of these people are self-employed second jobbers running their own business on the side; which is an increase of 40 per cent on 2006.

The most common double-jobbers to run their own business on the side are men aged between 25 and 34 years old.

The digital services sector is the most common area for double-jobbers to launch their business idea, followed by PR and Marketing, Design and HR.

Reuben Sing, chief executive officer, alldayPA, said: “Many double job start-ups want to ensure customers are dealt with immediately, and are provided with answers to common questions, or emailed basic information.

“Ambitious entrepreneurs have been quick to embrace technology and services such as ours to help manage the transition from employment to running their own business.

“This is a trend the Government should be reacting to by cutting red tape for second job start-ups and simplifying the tax structure to help balance PAYE with self-employment and dividend payments.

“Such businesses may start small, but they will be major sources of employment and income, for years to come.”



Image: Camiel Schoonens